Engineering in Kenya

Generators in Electrical Engineering

Posted by on Jun 9, 2018 in Electrical Engineering | 0 comments


Generators in Electrical Engineering have a very common principle of operation. If one has ever moved paper pins around with any type of magnet,  or killed time playing with iron filling forming different shapes with them, then one has dabbled in the very basic principles behind even the most sophisticated electrical generators. Engineering in Kenya has more articles.

The magnetic field responsible for creating all the shapes with the iron fillings for Generators in Electrical Engineering is due to the movement of electrons. When one moves a magnet toward a paper pin, one forces the electrons in the paper pin to move. Similarly, if one allows electrons to move through a metallic conductor, a magnetic field immediately forms around the metallic conductor. Thanks to the Wooly Willy toy and play with iron fillings, we can see that there is a definite connection between the phenomena of magnetism and electricity.

Basic Definition of Generators in Electrical Engineering

Generators in Electrical Engineering are simply devices that move a magnet near a metallic conductor to create a steady and constant flow of electrons. The action that forces the movement varies greatly, ranging from the hand cranks and steam engines to nuclear reactors (where nuclear fission occurs producing energy), but the general principle of Generators in Electrical Engineering remains the same.

Understanding Generators in Electrical Engineering

Generators in Electrical Engineering Generators in Electrical Engineering

Generators in Electrical Engineering

One simple way of understanding Generators in Electrical Engineering is to think about generators as pumps pushing liquid through a pipe but instead of pushing liquid through a pipe, a generator uses the magnetic force to push electrons along a metallic conductor. This is a very simple explanation (slightly oversimplified), but it paints a useful and helpful picture of the features at work in a generator.

A water pump for example moves a specific number of water molecules and applies a certain amount of force/pressure to them. In the same way, Generators in Electrical Engineering push a certain number of electrons along the metallic conductor and applies a certain amount of “force”/ “pressure” to the electrons.

In an electrical circuit, the number of electrons passing through a metallic conductor called the current or amperage, and the unit used to measure amperage is called amperes/amps for Generators in Electrical Engineering. The “pressure”/ “force” pushing the electrons along the metallic conductor is called the voltage and the unit used to measure voltage is volts. For example, a generator spinning at 1000 rotations per minute may produce 1 ampere at 6 volts.

The 1 ampere is the number of electrons moving along the metallic conductor (1 ampere means that 6.24 x 1018 electrons are moving through the metallic conductor every second), and the voltage is the amount of pressure/force behind those electrons for Generators in Electrical Engineering. Generators form the main part/heart of a modern power station.

Conclusion on Generators in Electrical Engineering

Generators in Electrical Engineering can be defined as devices that convert mechanical energy to electrical energy. With that in mind, we can do something small on electricity.

Electricity
According to the Ohm’s Law, electric potential difference p.d is directly proportional to the product of the amperage I and the resistance R. i.e.  Voltage = current × resistance

468x60 002 Generators in Electrical Engineering

V = IR

There is a relationship between power P and current I and the voltage, and is as follows in Generators in Electrical Engineering;    Power = current × voltage                                                                                                                                P = IV

Using the same equations above we can conclude that;

P = V2 / R, and

P = I2 R

Resistance of Resistors in Series

he efficient resistance (RE) of a set of resistors in series is as follows;

RE = R1 + R2 + R3 + – - -

Resistance of Resistors in Parallel

The efficient resistance (RE) of a set of resistors in parallel is as follows;

468x60 002 Generators in Electrical Engineering

1/RE = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3 + – - – in Generators in Electrical Engineering